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Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Autism: A Review

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Autism

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy or HBOT is a form of treatment in which the patient breathes up to 100% oxygen intermittently under pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. This method was first used to treat decompression sickness, or ‘the bends’ in deep sea divers who faced problems when surfacing too quickly. As time went on it . . . → Read More: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Autism: A Review

Paper Mache as a Sensory Activity for Autism

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Paper mâché can be used to provide sensory input to a child with autism. The process of tearing paper, making paste out of glue and water and mixing the torn bits of paper into the paste helps the child experience varieties of sensations. Thus the activity can be fun as well as therapeutic for the . . . → Read More: Paper Mache as a Sensory Activity for Autism

Using Bath time as a Sensory Therapy

Making Bath Time Theraputic for Children with Autism

Who said that only Occupational Therapists can give sensory therapy? Most children with autism need a balanced sensory diet, that is, opportunities to participate in a variety of sensory activities and experience all the different sensations over the day. Although the level and type of sensory input each child needs is different, they all benefit . . . → Read More: Using Bath time as a Sensory Therapy

Teaching Children with Autism about Emotions:

Teaching children with autism about emotions

Emotions are one of the things children with autism find very difficult to communicate. Here’s an idea to get your toddler or young child with autism to learn to define their emotions.

Use Emotion words frequently– some words you can start with are mad, happy, sad and angry. Every time the child is going through . . . → Read More: Teaching Children with Autism about Emotions:

The Verdict : Gluten-Free-Casein-Free Diet in Autism

Gluten Free Casein Free Diet for Autism

A Gluten Free Casein Free diet for Autism tries to eliminate the dietary intake of these proteins in order to see favorable results in autistic symptoms. . . . → Read More: The Verdict : Gluten-Free-Casein-Free Diet in Autism

The Verdict: Dolphin Assisted Therapy for Autism

Dolphin Assisted Therapy

What is Dolphin Assisted Therapy?

Dolphin Assisted Therapy, or DAT, is a therapy used to improve speech and motor skills in people with physical and/or emotional problems. It involves one-on-one contact with dolphins. It was first used to treat depression, but is now also used for children with learning disabilities, speech impediments, Autism, Downs Syndrome, . . . → Read More: The Verdict: Dolphin Assisted Therapy for Autism

Crushed Paper Sensory Activity

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A sensory activity that you can use for a child with Autism . . . → Read More: Crushed Paper Sensory Activity

The “Happiness Rating Chart”

Child marks 3 stars against an activity that makes him very very happy

Children on the autism spectrum have difficulties in understanding and evaluating their own emotions. Here’s an activity that helps develop these skills.

As children with Autism, Asperger’s or PDD become older, we need to teach them to make choices. Also understanding the concept of priority, or what they want the most is very important. To . . . → Read More: The “Happiness Rating Chart”

The Verdict: Music Therapy for Autism

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The Verdict on Music Therapy: Is this the right type of therapy for your child with Autism? . . . → Read More: The Verdict: Music Therapy for Autism

Visual Schedules: The “What’s Next” Booklet

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Here’s an idea that I came up with while working with a child with PDD, and maybe you could use it too. As we know children with autism love routines and schedules and work so much better when they have a clear idea of what’s going to happen next. Schedules can be visual like a . . . → Read More: Visual Schedules: The “What’s Next” Booklet